Stimulating Creativity

If you are participating in PiBoIdMo, I hope you are having as much fun as I am with the challenge of coming up with a new picture book idea every day. I look over my growing list of ideas and let my imagination wander… so far the visual images are more clear to me than the words, but that’s the way it works for me, and I know the words will come.

Where do you get your inspiration?

For me, the initial idea can come from almost anywhere: a memory, a phrase I hear, the way my dog looks at me, or the artwork and images I see. I have a collection of children’s books which includes those of my mother’s childhood; sometimes these old books speak the loudest.

Pat-A-Cake by C.M.Burd from The Brimful Book, Platt & Munk Company 1929

Pat-A-Cake by C.M.Burd
from The Brimful Book, Platt & Munk Company 1929

by Johnny Gruelle from Raggedy Ann Stories, P.F. Volland Company 1918

by Johnny Gruelle
from Raggedy Ann Stories, P.F. Volland Company 1918

by Miriam Story Hurford from Science Stories, Book One, Scott Foresman & Company 1933

by Miriam Story Hurford
from Science Stories, Book One, Scott Foresman & Company 1933

For a look at how three talented author-illustrators working today get their creative juices flowing, take a look at today’s post from Tara Lazar’s blog, Writing for Kids (While Raising Them) which features a guest blog post for PiBoIdMo from The Girllustrators, Austin-based kidlit artists.

I would be interested in how you get YOUR ideas!

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About susandilldetwiler

Freelance illustrator living in Baltimore
This entry was posted in Author/Illustrator Events, Guest Contributors, Illustrating & Cover Art Tips, Writing & Drawing Exercises and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Stimulating Creativity

  1. Listen to singer/songwriters. The great songs take as long as a picture book and demand to be played over and over. Walking around with the music of Paul Simon, Kate Rusby, Mark Knopfler, Tom Waits, Natalie Merchant, Bob Dylan, Nina Simone evokes characters and settings and moods to explore.

  2. I like this idea! Comparing a picture book with a song is brilliant.

  3. Pingback: An As The Eraser Burns Goodbye to Susan Detwiler | As the Eraser Burns

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